Forum Posts

jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Aug 17, 2022
In Ask the Therapist, Anonymously
Busy men might want to consider sitting down when they pee — not because it’s one of the few moments of the day they can rest, but because it might be better for them. For older men with prostate problems, in particular, sitting down to urinate could help them empty their bladders more effectively and reduce the risks of cysts and other health complications.
Yes, It Might Be Healthier For Some Men To Sit When They Pee, Urologists Say content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Jul 03, 2022
In Education, Home & Cyber School
A well-known Philadelphia architectural designer, Abele was the first black graduate of what is today the School of Design. Julian Francis Abele, born in Philadelphia on April 30, 1881, was the youngest of eight children born to Charles and Mary Adelaide Jones Abele. Through his mother Adelaide, Julian was a descendant of Reverend Absalom Jones (1746-1818), founder of the Free African Society and of St. Thomas Episcopal Church. His older brothers included Joseph B. Abele, an engineer with the Philadelphia Electric Company; Robert Jones Abele, who graduated at the top of his 1895 class at Hahnemann Medical College; Charles Abele, a brass sign maker who worked with artisan Sam Yellin. Young Julian Abele was educated at the Institute for Colored Youth, Brown Prep School and the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art before enrolling at the University of Pennsylvania in 1898. An outstanding student, Abele received a number of prizes during his undergraduate years at Penn, including first prize in competition for the Library Tablet to commemorate alumni gifts, first prize in competition for the Conklin Memorial Gateway at Haverford College, first mention from the Beaux Arts Society, the Arthur Spayde Brooke Memorial Prize and the T-Square Club Prize. During his senior year, Abele served on the student yearbook committee and as president of the Architectural Society. He did all this while working all four years as a designer with the Louis Hickman Architectural Firm, juggling his job with afternoon and evening classes at the University. After graduating from Penn in 1902 with his degree in architecture, Abele was immediately engaged by established architect Horace Trumbauer, who is said to have helped to finance the young architect’s three years European travel and study. There is no record of his study at l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, which is sometimes reported, although French architecture would be his lifelong passion. Abele returned to Philadelphia and the Horace Trumbauer firm in 1906. He spent his entire professional life with this large, nationally known firm, advancing to the position of chief designer in 1909 and taking over the office after Trumbauer’s death in 1938. Read more….. https://archives.upenn.edu/exhibits/penn-people/biography/julian-francis-abele/
Institute of color youth content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
May 26, 2022
In Mom/Dad/Parents and More
It's normal for kids to feel sad, act grouchy, or be in a bad mood at times. But when a sad or bad mood lasts for weeks or longer, and when there are other changes in a child's behavior, it might be depression. Therapy can help children who are going through sadness or depression. And there are things parents can do, too. Getting the right care can prevent things from getting worse and help a child feel better. If sadness has lasted for weeks or longer, talk about it with your child's doctor. How Can I Tell if My Child Is Depressed? If a child is depressed, parents may notice some of these signs: Sad or bad mood. A child may seem sad, lonely, unhappy, or grouchy. It can last weeks or months. A child may cry more easily. They may have more tantrums than before. Being self-critical. Kids going through depression may complain a lot. They may say self-critical things like, "I can't do anything right." "I don't have any friends." "I can't do this." "It's too hard for me." Lack of energy and effort. Depression can drain a child's energy. They might put less effort into school than before. Even doing little tasks can feel like too much effort. Kids may seem tired, give up easily, or not try. Not enjoying things. Kids don't have as much fun with friends or enjoy playing like before. They may not feel like doing things they used to enjoy. Sleep and eating changes. Kids may not sleep well or seem tired even if they get enough sleep. Some may not feel like eating. Others may overeat. Aches and pains. Some children may have stomach aches or other pains. Some miss school days because of not feeling well, even though they aren't sick. What Causes Child Depression? Different things can lead to depression. There is no single cause. Some children have genes that make them more sensitive to depression. They may have other family members who have been depressed. Some children go through stressful things. Some have faced loss, trauma, or hardships. Some go through serious health conditions. These things can lead to sadness or grief — and sometimes to depression. Having extra support during and after hard times helps protect children from depression or lessen the effects. But even when they have good support, some children get depressed. Therapy can help them heal, feel better, and get back to enjoying things. What Is the Therapy for Child Depression? The therapy for child depression is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Therapists help kids feel welcome and supported. They have kids talk about what they think and feel. They may use stories, play, lessons, or workbooks. These tools can help children feel at ease and get the most from CBT. When possible, a child's therapy includes their parent. If a child has gone through a loss, trauma, or other difficult events, the therapy will include things that help a child heal from that, too. And if a parent is dealing with their own loss or depression, the child's therapist can help them get the care and support they need. What Should I Do if I Think My Child Is Depressed? If you think your child is depressed: Talk with your child about sadness and depression. Kids might not know why they are so sad and why things seem so hard. Let them know you see that they're going through a hard time and that you're there to help. Listen, comfort, offer your support, and show love. Set up a visit with your child's doctor. Let your child's doctor know if sad or bad moods seem to go on for a few weeks. By itself, this doesn't always mean a child is depressed. Tell your child's doctor if you have also noticed changes in your child's sleep, eating, energy, or effort. Tell them if your child is dealing with a loss, a big stress, or hardship. The doctor will do a physical exam. A full exam lets the doctor check for health issues that could cause your child's symptoms. They can also check for depression. Your child's doctor may refer you to a child therapist. The doctor's office might have a child therapist on staff. Set up a visit with a child therapist. A child therapist (mental health doctor) will spend time talking with you and your child. They will do an in-depth check for depression by asking questions and listening. The therapist can explain how therapy can help your child. Take your child to therapy visits. The therapist may suggest a few visits, or more. Therapy can take time, but you will see progress along the way. Be patient and kind. When your child acts moody or difficult, try to stay patient. Talk with your child's therapist about the best ways to respond when your child acts this way. Often, it helps to connect with your child in a calm way, then guide them to better behavior. Instead of feeling bad, this lets kids feel proud of doing better. It lets them see that you're proud of them, too. Enjoy time together. Spend time with your child doing things you both can enjoy. Go for a walk, play a game, cook, read stories, make a craft, watch a funny movie. Spend time outdoors if you can. These things gently encourage positive moods. They help you and your child feel close. Reviewed by: D'Arcy Lyness, PhD Date reviewed: September 2021
Childhood Depression: What Parents Need to Know content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Apr 04, 2022
In Education, Home & Cyber School
A school psychologist offers advice to parents on how to support their child during school closures. With nationwide school closures in effect, many parents are now monitoring homeschooling while at the same time trying to make a living in the midst of a terrible economic crisis. In this environment of broken routine and uncertainty, chances are your child is showing big feelings and challenging behaviors. In my work as a school psychologist, I’ve been hearing from parents that despite their best efforts, their children are struggling with meeting homeschool expectations. Kids who never showed behavioral or emotional challenges are experiencing issues, and kids who had some struggles before are showing an uptick of challenges. Here are three ways to support your child (and manage your own stress) during school closures that parents I work with have found helpful. 1. Simplify: Relax your homeschooling and productivity standards to a level appropriate for a worldwide pandemic If you’re a parent suddenly trying to balance remote work and homeschooling, your household might look a bit like mine right now. As I am writing this, I am also toggling back and forth between helping my third-grader with Google Classroom, trying to set up my kindergartener for some independent writing work, and fielding questions every few seconds (wait, what is the difference between scalene and isosceles triangles again?!?). I’ve come to realize in these past few weeks that being super productive with my work as a school psychologist AND giving full attention to homeschooling my children is not possible right now. Turns out, being a parent, teacher, and school psychologist are three different jobs that cannot all be done well at the same time. Spending time wishing things were otherwise is an exercise in frustration. And since research shows that acceptance is an important trait in positive well-being, here are a few mantras about simplification you might want to try: I am not homeschooling. I am doing my best to help my kids learn at home during a crisis. I am not “working from home.” I am doing my best to work at home during a crisis. I cannot be as productive as normal because these are not normal times. I will focus on what I can accomplish in just the next 24 hours and let go of what I cannot accomplish right now. Read more…https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_to_reduce_the_stress_of_homeschooling_on_everyone
How to Reduce the Stress of Homeschooling on Everyone
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Mar 06, 2022
In Athletes and Athletics (Only)
The Westtown School girls basketball team celebrates on the court after defeating Penn Charter on Saturday in the PAISAA girls basketball championship at La Salle University. (Owen McCue – MediaNews Group) PHILADELPHIA >> On Friday, the night before the PAISAA girls basketball championship final, Westtown associate head coach Doug West noted, “Our team has a lot of resiliency. We’ve been in a lot of different situations, done a lot of travelling and seen a lot of different teams, and we’ve found ways to win games.” Westtown relied heavily on that resiliency Saturday night for an emotional 51-50 victory against Penn Charter in the PAISAA championship final at LaSalle University’s Tom Gola Arena. Please read more: https://papreplive.com/2022/03/05/westtown-girls-basketball-squad-edges-penn-charter-for-first-paisaa-tournament-title/
PAISAA tournament title content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Mar 06, 2022
In Athletes and Athletics (Only)
With an important contract decision looming in the off-season, Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving has changed his representation. Irving has hired Shetellia Riley Irving, who is also his stepmother, as his new agent, according to The Athletic’s Shams Charania. She is believed to be the only Black woman currently representing an active NBA player. Please read full article https://www.tsn.ca/kyrie-irving-hires-new-agent-hires-the-first-black-woman-to-represent-an-nba-player-1.1766334
Kyrie Irving hires
first Black woman
agent in the NBA content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Feb 26, 2022
In SCAM ALERTS!
President Biden formally announced Ketanji Brown Jackson as his nominee to the Supreme Court today. If confirmed, she would be the first Black woman to sit on the highest court in the nation. Senate Democratic leaders hope to have a vote confirming Jackson to the court by mid-April. Jackson, 51, currently sits on DC's federal appellate court and had been considered the front-runner for the vacancy since Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement. What Biden said about the nominee: Speaking from the White House, Biden said he was fulfilling his “responsibilities under the Constitution” in selecting Jackson, noting not only her character and talents, but also the significance of this specific nomination. “For too long, our government, our courts, haven't looked like America,” the President said. “I believe it's time that we have a court that reflects the full talents and greatness of our nation with a nominee of extraordinary qualifications, and that we inspire all young people to believe that they can one day serve their country at the highest level.” Biden said it was his "honor to introduce to the country a daughter of former public school teachers a proven consensus builder and an accomplished lawyer and distinguished jurist, on one of the nation's most prestigious courts." What Jackson said about the nomination: Taking to the podium after Biden, Jackson said she is "humbled by the extraordinary honor" to be the President's nominee. She also took a moment to recognize that Biden's nomination comes amid deadly conflict across the globe. "I am especially grateful for the care that you have taken in discharging your constitutional duty in service of our democracy, with all that is going on in the world today," said Jackson, a reference to the invasion of Ukraine by Russia. She credited her father, who transitioned from a teaching career to life as a law student, for first introducing her to her chosen profession. "Some of my earliest memories are of him sitting at the kitchen table reading his books," she said. "I watched him study and he became my first professional role model." Jackson also took a moment to pay homage to Breyer, a man for whom she once clerked, and once confirmed, will ultimately replace. "Justice Breyer, the members of the Senate will decide if I fill your seat. But please know that I could never fill your shoes," she said. Jackson thanked her friends and family members, while also revealing the large role her faith has played in her life and her career. "I must begin these very brief remarks by thanking God for delivering me to this point in my professional journey. My life has been blessed beyond measure and I do know that one can only come this far by faith," Jackson said when opening her remarks. "Among my many blessings, and indeed the very first, is the fact that I was born in this great country ... The United States of America is the greatest beacon of hope and democracy the world has ever known." What comes next: Biden, who reportedly called Jackson and offered her the nomination on Thursday, noted that it's his hope that the Senate will move forward without hesitation to confirm her, adding that he had spoken with ranking members of the Senate Judiciary Committee in advance of the nomination. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, meanwhile, promised a “fair, timely and expeditious” confirmation process for Jackson and hopes she will win bipartisan support.
Biden nominated Ketanji Brown Jackson to SCOTUS today. content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Feb 20, 2022
In Artists-Authors-Entreprenuers
A Black woman is now a majority owner of a new multi-million dollar Film/Television studio in Atlanta, The Atlanta-Journal Constitution reports. Tammy ‘Dele Films has over 25 years of experience in the Film/Television industry. She has written and produced a plethora of projects such as films, biographies, documentaries, entertainment, and network news, according to her biography on IMDB. Williams owned her first digital production company called Tammy’Dele Film in 2016 and is now the first Black woman to own a $135 million studio and post-production facility space in Atlanta, Georgia. Williams and her business partner Gary Guidry, an investor and CEO of G-Square Events and Black Promoters Collective, founded Cinema South Studios. “We’ve been patient,” she said. “This has not been an overnight thing, this vision for us,” Williams has worked towards making her dream a reality for 12 years. They will begin to break ground in March for Cinema South Studios located north of Fayette County. The studio will occupy 60 acres and intends to have eleven soundstages, a back-lot, a prop house, a wardrobe rental facility, and a lighting grip rental house. The production facility will include a transportation company and an office building to house a theater and post-production facilities, reports AJC. Williams aims to have two soundstages operable by the first quarter of 2023. “The demand for soundstages is happening globally, and the ownership rarely looks like us, let alone an African American woman,” said Guidry said in an official release, reports AJC. “When I choose to invest, I evaluate the need of the business and the ownership. Investing in Tammy Williams and her team of professionals convinced me that buying the land in Fayetteville, GA.” Cinema South will serve as the umbrella for Williams’ production company, Tammy’ Dele Films. It will host the education section of Tammy’ Dele Films Workshop and Cinema South Film Academy, where she will conduct job training seminars. Currently, Tyler Perry Studios in Georgia us the largest film production studio in the United States, and established Perry as the first African-American to outright own a major film production studio.
Black Woman Will Own A $135 Multi-Million Dollar Production Studio In Atlanta  content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Feb 02, 2022
In Athletes and Athletics (Only)
By Ken Belson and Jenny Vrentas Published Feb. 1, 2022 The former head coach of the Miami Dolphins claimed in a class-action lawsuit filed Tuesday that the N.F.L. discriminated against him and other Black coaches in their hiring practices. “My sincere hope is that by standing up against systemic racism in the N.F.L., others will join me to ensure that positive change is made for generations to come,” Brian Flores said. Brian Flores, who was fired as coach of the Miami Dolphins last month and was rejected for new jobs with other clubs, has sued the N.F.L. and its 32 teams alleging that they have discriminated against him and other Black coaches in their hiring practices. His filing in federal court comes just days after the Giants, one of the teams he interviewed with for a position, named Brian Daboll, who is white, as their head coach. Flores cited text messages he said were sent by his former boss, New England Patriots Coach Bill Belichick. In the messages, Belichick appears to congratulate Flores for winning the Giants’ job, which he had yet to interview for at that point. Flores responded by asking if Belichick had intended the message for Daboll, who interviewed before Flores’s scheduled meeting. The respondent answered: “I think they are naming Daboll. I’m sorry about that. BB” A Giants spokesman, Pat Hanlon, said in a statement the team was “confident with the process that resulted in the hiring of Brian Daboll” and that “Flores was in the conversation to be our head coach until the eleventh hour.” A Patriots spokesman said he did not anticipate that the team would be issuing a response. Flores and Belichick shook hands after a game in 2019 in Miami Gardens, Fla. Mark Brown/Getty Images The N.F.L. said it is “deeply committed to ensuring equitable employment practices” and “we will defend against these claims, which are without merit.” The screenshots of a conversation purportedly initiated by Belichick, the notoriously tight-lipped coach, and as well as other anecdotes that paint an unflattering portrait of Stephen Ross, the Dolphins’ owner, provide a rare insight into the league’s business in a class-action suit that contends there is widespread discrimination in the N.F.L. Flores is the son of Honduran immigrants to the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn. He led the Dolphins for three years, including two winning seasons, and in the suit said he was “humiliated in the process as the New York Giants subjected him to a sham interview in an attempt to appear to provide a Black candidate with a legitimate chance at obtaining the job.” In a statement, Flores said that he understood that “I may be risking coaching the game that I love and that has done so much for my family and me. My sincere hope is that by standing up against systemic racism in the N.F.L., others will join me to ensure that positive change is made for generations to come.” In his suit, Flores stated that there were more than 40 other coaches who could join the class action, though he did not name any of them. Still, the case faces high legal hurdles, most prominently because Flores needs to prove that race was specifically a factor in his being turned down for jobs, even as he continues to interview for open coaching positions. “I view this lawsuit as next to impossible to succeed and I’m extremely surprised he would put his career in jeopardy,” said Brad Sohn, a lawyer who has represented numerous N.F.L. players. The N.F.L. has acknowledged repeatedly that there are not enough coaches and team executives of color even as about 70 percent of players are Black. Nearly 20 years ago, the league introduced the Rooney Rule, which requires teams to interview a diverse list of candidates for coaching and general. The league has expanded and strengthen those guidelines since the rule’s introduction as the number of Black coaches has failed to grow appreciably, and fallen in some years. Yet the league still has only a handful of nonwhite men in head coaching jobs. With Flores’s ouster, Mike Tomlin of the Pittsburgh Steelers is the lone Black head coach in the league, while Ron Rivera of the Washington Football Team is the N.F.L.’s only Hispanic head coach. The Jets’ Robert Saleh is believed to be the league’s first Muslim Arab American head coach. Black coaches have long complained that they are often called for interviews simply so teams can comply with the Rooney Rule, and that they were not considered serious candidates. Flores named other Black coaches he said have been discriminated against, including the former Colts and Lions head coach Jim Caldwell; the former Cardinals head coach Steve Wilks; and the former Texans head coach David Culley, who was fired last month after one season. In his filing. Flores asserts that his experiences interviewing with league executives shows their callous approach to abiding by the Rooney Rule. In texts exchanged on Jan. 24, three days before Flores was set to meet Giants executives, Belichick wrote: “I hear from Buffalo & NYG that you are their guy.” Apparently aware that Daboll, who coached with the Bills this season, was also interviewing for the Giants’ opening, Flores asked Belichick whether he was referring to Daboll or him. Belichick then apologized. “I double checked and misread the text.” One of Flores’s lawyers, Douglas Wigdor, said that Flores reached out to their firm the same day he received the texts from Belichick. Wigdor’s employment litigation firm has represented numerous women who accused the film producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct, as well as former Fox News employees in harassment and discrimination cases. The complaint was filed as a putative class action, requiring certification from the court to proceed. Wigdor said his firm was currently investigating other claims from other coaches who could be part of the potential class. Flores is still a candidate in the open head coach searches for the Houston Texans and New Orleans Saints. Wigdor said they wanted to move forward regardless of the outcome of those interviews. “We weren’t going to wait and be coy and see if he got a job,” he said. Flores spent 15 years as an assistant under Belichick before getting his first head coaching job, but was interviewed as a candidate for other openings before being hired in 2019 by the Dolphins, where he had a 24-25 record in three seasons. Giants General Manager Joe Schoen posed with Brian Daboll, the team’s new head coach, on Monday. Before being hired by the Dolphins, Flores said he sat for what he called a “sham” interview with executives from the Denver Broncos. In that meeting, Flores said that John Elway, then the team’s general manager, and Joe Ellis, the team’s president, and others showed up an hour late. “It was clear from the substance of the interview that Mr. Flores was interviewed only because of the Rooney Rule, and that the Broncos never had any intention to consider him as a legitimate candidate for the job,” the lawsuit states.
Brian Flores Sues N.F.L., Claiming Bias in Coaching Search content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Feb 02, 2022
In Inspiring Posts/Videos
On February 25, 1837, Cheyney University of Pennsylvania became the nation’s first Historically Black College and University (HBCU). The University was established through the bequest of Richard Humphreys, a Quaker philanthropist who bequeathed $10,000 — one-tenth of his estate — to design and establish a school to educate people of African descent and prepare them as teachers. First known as the African Institute, the school was soon renamed the Institute for Colored Youth. In its early years, it provided training in trades and agriculture, which were the predominant skills needed in the general economy. In 1902, the Institute was relocated to George Cheyney’s farm, a 275-acre property just 25 miles west of Philadelphia. The name “Cheyney” became associated with the school in 1913, though the school’s official name changed several times during the 20th century. As a charter member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE), Cheyney State College became Cheyney University of Pennsylvania in 1983, the oldest of the fourteen member institutions and the only HBCU in the state system. While Cheyney University has a rich heritage as the first institution of higher learning for African Americans, our campus today welcomes students from a variety of races, cultures, and nationalities, all of whom receive educational instruction far beyond the vision of Richard Humphreys. Cheyney graduates still become teachers, but our alumni also enter careers such as journalism, medicine, business, science/technology, law, communications, and government service. The University offers baccalaureate degrees in an array of disciplines, and many graduates go on to secure advanced degrees in a variety of fields. Cheyney University boasts more than 30,000 graduates. Well-known alumni include: Late Ed Bradley, a correspondent for the CBS program “60 Minutes;” Pedro Rivera, Pennsylvania Secretary of Education; Robert W. Bogle, publisher and CEO of the Philadelphia Tribune, the oldest newspaper continuously owned and operated by an African American; Dr. Audrey F. Bronson, a member of the PA State System of Higher Education’s Board of Governors, ordained minister and retired educator; Dr. Gladys Styles Johnston, former Chancellor of the University of Nebraska at Kearney; Thaddeus Kirkland, State Representative and Mayor of Chester, PA; Late Bayard Rustin, a prominent civil rights activist.
The First HBCU content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Feb 02, 2022
In Inspiring Posts/Videos
Azie Taylor Morton, the only African-American to serve as United States treasurer, died here on Dec. 7. She was 67. Ms. Morton died at an Austin hospital after suffering a stroke at her home in Bastrop, said State Representative Dawnna Dukes, a longtime family friend. Ms. Morton was appointed treasurer in 1977 by President Jimmy Carter and served until 1981. The treasurer reports to the secretary of the treasury, the principal economic adviser to the president. Ms. Morton served on President John F. Kennedy's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity and was an observer for presidential elections in Haiti, Senegal and the Dominican Republic. She graduated from Huston-Tillotson College in Austin in 1956 with a bachelor's degree in commercial education. Her first job after college was teaching delinquent students. Ms. Morton's husband, James Morton, died in January. She is survived by two daughters, Virgie Floyd and Stacey Hurst, both of Austin, as well as grandchildren and great-grandchildren
Azie Taylor Morton, 67, U.S. Treasurer Under Carter content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Feb 01, 2022
In Education, Home & Cyber School
If the term “Moor” seems familiar but confusing, there’s a reason: Though the term can be found throughout literature, art, and history books, it does not actually describe a specific ethnicity or race. Instead, the concept of Moors has been used to describe alternatively the reign of Muslims in Spain, Europeans of African descent, and others for centuries. Derived from the Latin word “Maurus,” the term was originally used to describe Berbers and other people from the ancient Roman province of Mauretaniain what is now North Africa. Over time, it was increasingly applied to Muslims living in Europe. Beginning in the Renaissance, “Moor” and “blackamoor” were also used to describe any person with dark skin. In A.D. 711, a group of North African Muslims led by the Berber general, Tariq ibn-Ziyad, captured the Iberian Peninsula (modern Spain and Portugal). Known as al-Andalus, the territory became a prosperous cultural and economic center where education and the arts and sciences flourished. Over time, the strength of the Muslim state diminished, creating inroads for Christians who resented Moorish rule. For centuries, Christian groups challenged Muslim territorial dominance in al-Andalus and slowly expanded their territory. This culminated in 1492, when Catholic monarchs Ferdinand II and Isabella Iwon the Granada War and completed Spain’s conquest of the Iberian Peninsula. Eventually, the Moors were expelled from Spain. By then, the idea of Moors had spread across Western Europe. “Moor” came to mean anyone who was Muslim or had dark skin; occasionally, Europeans would distinguish...
Who were the Moors content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Jan 30, 2022
In Education, Home & Cyber School
Dyslexia is the most commonly diagnosed learning disorder and help is widely available. “If your child is having a hard time learning to read, struggling with pronunciation or spelling, and finding it difficult to recognize words, it may be time to have them tested for dyslexia. Dyslexia, or developmental dyslexia, is the most common neurobehavioral learning disorder. Between 80% to 90% of those diagnosed with learning disabilities have dyslexia, according to the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity. Overall, dyslexia affects an estimated 1 in 5 Americans. Here is what parents need to know about testing for dyslexia in schools, where it often manifests most clearly. What is Dyslexia? Dyslexia is characterized by deficits in accurate and fluent word recognition, according to the Learning Disabilities Association of America. Students with dyslexia have difficulty with spelling, word recognition and decoding, despite normal or above-average intelligence. As a result, reading comprehension may be impacted. The brain-based reading disorder can manifest in different ways, depending on the child’s age and stage, as well as the context of the school and instructional methods being used, says Rebecca Mannis, a learning specialist and founder of Ivy Prep Learning Center in New York. The most common signs of dyslexia are omitting or transposing letters when reading or writing; taking a long time to complete a reading assignment; having difficulty decoding multisyllabic words; or experiencing difficulty reading aloud, says Kathryn Starke, a literacy consultant, reading specialist and author in Virginia. Children with dyslexia struggle with phonetic awareness, which includes things like rhyming and sound repetition in words, Flink says. “They may also become more reserved and less willing to engage with others, lose confidence in themselves, become disinterested in school, act out and get upset more easily,” he says. It is also common for students with dyslexia to have problems enunciating common letters, vowels or blends, says Raymond Witte, dean of the College of Education at the University of Toledo. “A slow and disjointed reading pattern is likely,” he says. “Extreme frustration can be demonstrated by students as they are working hard and putting forth effort to read just like their peers. These students know they are having problems but they don’t know why.” If your child shows these common signs, education experts say you should request testing for dyslexia in school.
What Parents Need to Know About Testing for Dyslexia in Schools content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Jan 23, 2022
In Education, Home & Cyber School
When our children enter school, it is often filled with excitement and a desire to learn. Children, their families, and teachers begin their journey into education with the idea that reading will be unlocked as the lessons unfold. This reminds me of one of my favorite books, Thank You, Mr. Falker, by Patricia Pollacco. The book's family gathers around a little girl as she is about to embark on her year in kindergarten and shares how she will learn to chase knowledge through the pages of books. Reading is ingrained in us at a very young age with great importance. We know this is true for many reasons, but the student struggling with acquiring this skill may begin to feel anxiety and stress surrounding their struggles to unlock the words on the pages. These students see their peers choosing chapter books while they are still reading from an assigned book basket. They recognize that their peers complete writing assignments when they have just gotten their ideas organized. They may not understand why reading is such a challenge for them. In response to this, there may be many times throughout the day when they feel their stress levels rise. Having years of working with students that have experienced a great deal of struggle and failure, I know that they often bring big emotions with them. As a parent, I know that our children usually keep their big emotions for those they feel safe with. It doesn't make it easier, though. So, what's a parent, caregiver, or educator to do? The quote from L.R. Knost, "When little people are overwhelmed by big emotions, it's our job to share our calm, not join in their chaos." is one that I keep at the forefront of my parenting and teaching. When we step back, keep calm, and not react with emotion, we can reflect on what is happening and determine if stress or anxiety is a compounding factor. The definition of anxiety is the worry about what might be, while stress is the reaction to what is. Stress can be used to motivate us if we have the mindset to view the task as a challenge. However, repeated failure or feeling like no matter what you do or how hard you try, the outcome will remain the same can cause a negative response of retreat or shutting down. Students with dyslexia may be more prone to anxiety as vast negative experiences can erode self-esteem and shift one's perspective. For a dyslexic student, stress and anxiety may occur at different points of the day.
How to Help Students with Reading Stress and Anxiety content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Jan 12, 2022
In Inspiring Posts/Videos
SHINGTON – The United States Mint (Mint) is pleased to announce the official designs for the first five coins in the American Women Quarters Program. Authorized by Public Law 116-330, this four-year program features coins with reverse (tails) designs emblematic of the accomplishments and contributions of trailblazing American women. Beginning in 2022 and continuing through 2025, the Mint will issue five quarters in each of these years. The ethnically, racially, and geographically diverse group of individuals honored through this program reflects a wide range of accomplishments and fields, including suffrage, civil rights, abolition, government, humanities, science, space, and the arts. The 2022 coins recognize the achievements of Maya Angelou, Dr. Sally Ride, Wilma Mankiller, Nina Otero-Warren, and Anna May Wong. “These inspiring coin designs tell the stories of five extraordinary women whose contributions are indelibly etched in American culture,” said United States Mint Acting Director Alison L. Doone. “Generations to come will look at coins bearing these designs and be reminded of what can be accomplished with vision, determination and a desire to improve opportunities for all.” 2022 Reverse Designs The Secretary of the Treasury selected the final designs in accordance with the design selection process, which is available here. All reverse designs were created by United States Mint Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) Designers and sculpted by United States Mint Medallic Artists. Line art of the designs is available here. Maya Angelou—celebrated writer, performer, social activist Designer: Emily Damstra, AIP Designer Sculptor: Craig A. Campbell, Medallic Artist The design depicts Maya Angelou with her arms uplifted. Behind her are a bird in flight and a rising sun, images inspired by her poetry and symbolic of the way she lived. Inscriptions are “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “MAYA ANGELOU,” “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” and “QUARTER DOLLAR.” Dr. Sally Ride—physicist, astronaut, educator, and first American woman to soar into space Designer: Elana Hagler, AIP Designer Sculptor: Phebe Hemphill, Medallic Artist This design depicts Dr. Ride next to a window on the space shuttle, inspired by her quote, “But when I wasn’t working, I was usually at a window looking down at Earth.” The inscription “E PLURIBUS UNUM” is intentionally positioned over the Earth next to America, indicating that out of all women in the United States, Dr. Ride was the first into space. The additional inscriptions are “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “QUARTER DOLLAR,” and “DR. SALLY RIDE.” Wilma Mankiller—first woman elected principal chief of the Cherokee Nation and an activist for Native American and women’s rights Designer: Ben Sowards, AIP Designer Sculptor: Phebe Hemphill, Medallic Artist This design depicts Wilma Mankiller with a resolute gaze to the future. The wind is at her back, and she is wrapped in a traditional shawl. To her left is the seven-pointed star of the Cherokee Nation. Inscriptions are “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” “QUARTER DOLLAR,” “WILMA MANKILLER,” “PRINCIPAL CHIEF,” and “CHEROKEE NATION,” which is written in the Cherokee syllabary. Nina Otero-Warren—a leader in New Mexico’s suffrage movement and the first female superintendent of Santa Fe public schools Designer: Chris Costello, AIP Designer Sculptor: Craig A. Campbell, Medallic Artist The design features an image of Nina Otero-Warren on the left, flanked by three individual Yucca flowers—New Mexico’s state flower. Inscriptions are “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “QUARTER DOLLAR,” “E PLUIBUS UNUM,” “NINA OTERO-WARREN,” and “VOTO PARA LA MUJER,” the Spanish counterpart for the suffragist slogan “Votes for Women.” Anna May Wong—first Chinese American film star in Hollywood, who left a legacy for women in the film industry Designer: Emily Damstra, AIP Designer Sculptor: John P. McGraw, Medallic Artist This design features a close-up image of Anna May Wong with her head resting on her hand, surrounded by the bright lights of a marquee sign. Inscriptions are “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” “QUARTER DOLLAR,” and “ANNA MAY WONG.” Common Obverse (Heads) Design The obverse design of all coins in the American Women Quarters Program is by Laura Gardin Fraser, one of the most prolific female sculptors of the early 20th century, whose works span the art and numismatic worlds. Fraser’s design depicts a portrait of George Washington, which was originally composed and sculpted as a candidate to mark George Washington’s 200th birthday. Though recommended for the 1932 quarter, then-Treasury Secretary Mellon ultimately selected the familiar John Flannigan design. Inscriptions are “LIBERTY,” “IN GOD WE TRUST,” and “2022.” On-sale dates for products containing the 2022 American Women Quarters Program will be published on the Mint’s Product Schedule here. When available, the Mint will accept orders at catalog.usmint.gov/. About the United States Mint Congress created the United States Mint in 1792, and the Mint became part of the Department of the Treasury in 1873. As the Nation’s sole manufacturer of legal tender coinage, the Mint is responsible for producing circulating coinage for the Nation to conduct its trade and commerce. The Mint also produces numismatic products, including proof, uncirculated, and commemorative coins; Congressional Gold Medals; silver and bronze medals; and silver and gold bullion coins. Its numismatic programs are self-sustaining and operate at no cost to taxpayers.
United States Mint Announces Designs for 2022 American Women Quarters™ Program Coins content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Jan 09, 2022
In Artists-Authors-Entreprenuers
By Caroline Framke The further history gets from us, the easier it becomes to dismiss it as some far-flung past when, in fact, it remains all too relevant to our present. “Women of the Movement,” premiering Jan. 6 on ABC, directly aims to rectify that, putting a sharp focus on a story that, for too many, keeps fading into distant memory. Developed as an anthology series to highlight a different piece of American history every season, “Women of the Movement” first follows Mamie Till-Mobley, whose 14 year-old son Emmett became a national flashpoint upon his brutal murder in 1955. After his death, Till-Mobley became a prominent civil rights figure in her own right both by terrible accident and grim design. The image of a grieving Black mother put a powerful face to a type of crime that had gone unremarked upon for decades — and yet, it’s impossible to watch “Women of the Movement” and not think of the Black mothers who continue to be in this position, over and over again to no avail, to this day and inevitably beyond. Written by Marissa Jo Cerar, and directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood, Tina Mabry, Julie Dash and Kasi Lemmons, this first season of “Women of the Movement” does all it can to imbue Emmett Till and his mother with the kind of humanity they have long been denied. Emmett, played with a heartbreaking openness by Cedric Joe, is an eager kid whose curiosity can get the better of him, as is typical of just about any kid. Mamie, powerfully played by recent Tony Award winner Adrienne Warren, is a mother so devoted to her child that when the white doctor who delivered him suggested she needed to give him up lest his developmental challenges overwhelm her, she didn’t hesitate a second before refusing. Though ABC’s (terrible) tagline for her season of “Women of the Movement” is “his life made her a mother; his death made her a fighter,” the show itself demonstrates how Mamie was always both. Over the course of six episodes (airing two at a time alongside companion ABC news specials on Till), “Women of the Movement” portrays the birth, death, and afterlife of Emmett Till through the eyes of Mamie, the wider Black community mourning him, and the white Mississippians who couldn’t see him as anything other than a threat. There’s only so many subtleties the show can afford given such limited time, and so it often defaults to making each scene the most blunt version of itself in order to make maximum impact. But as the series also emphasizes, “the most blunt version of itself” is all too true to the reality of the racism it’s highlighting. Still, there is a version of this story that would indulge its physical brutality in place of its emotional counterpart, and this one largely avoids that imbalance thanks to the able and often moving direction from Prince-Bythewood, Mabry, Dash, and Lemmons. (Viewers should be warned, though, that while early episodes avoid showing graphic details of the murder, a later episode does not.) What generally saves “Women of the Movement” from becoming a rote piece of didactic storytelling is both the empathy of the direction and vulnerability of its main actors. In his brief screen time, Joe fully embodies a child who has too often been relegated to a symbol status that strips him of his humanity. As his uncle Mose, who releases Emmett to his eventual murderers under threat of death, Glynn Turman is quietly devastating in every scene he gets. In the rare quiet moments when Mamie gets to take a breath at home, Ray Fisher and Tonya Pinkins turn in memorable performances as her concerned partner and mother, respectively. And of course there’s Warren, tasked with anchoring the series, who brings Mamie to visceral life even when the script gets necessarily clunky in its attempts to have her tie everything together. As Warren plays it with aching vulnerability, and as history has borne out too many times, Mamie’s victories as a civil rights activist nonetheless drain her, and so many other grieving Black mothers, of their time, energy, and capacity for hope. Warren and “Women of the Movement” alike are clear-eyed in their portrayals of how a past atrocity unfolded on the most personal levels, and how it continues to echo today. Even when the series hammers the morals of its story home, its refusal to pretend like this country’s made big enough strides since Till’s murder is a credit to its determination to tell the whole truth. “Women of the Movement” premieres Thursday, Jan. 6, at 8 p.m. on ABC.
ABC’s ‘Women of the Movement’ Takes on the Emmett Till Case, and a Black Mother’s Grief That Remains content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Jan 09, 2022
In Special Needs Info
Dyslexic learners thrive when they receive tailored support from their teachers and parents. No two students learn in exactly the same way, and dyslexic students have unique educational experiences that require different types of instruction. Although students with dyslexia may struggle with executive functioning and essential reading skills, encouraging them to take advantage of helpful accommodations can give dyslexic learners the skills they need to achieve great things. Accommodations are tools that help students with learning differences receive equal access to instruction and assessment. From altering an environment or assessment to providing special equipment or technology, accommodations enable students with learning differences to overcome challenges they may face in the classroom. Teachers and parents should be familiar with common accommodations for dyslexia to ensure that their students are learning in inclusive classrooms that work for them. Read below to learn more about common accommodations that can be beneficial for students with dyslexia. Implementing Technology and New Methods. When teachers are educated on effective accommodations and modifications, they can make changes to their classroom that benefit students with dyslexia and other learning differences. Although online learning was a major challenge for parents, teachers, and students, many now realize the impact that specialized resources and classroom accommodations can have, especially on children with learning differences. Therefore, the transition back into in-person learning is the perfect opportunity to implement assistive technology into the classroom environment. Common classroom accommodations can take the form of digital reading remediation, such as audiobooks, text-to-speech software, dyslexia-friendly fonts, and other writing and reading programs. With other assistive technologies automatically included in newer tablets and devices, students with dyslexia have unlimited potential to explore software to overcome their learning challenges. These technologies can introduce dyslexic students to new methods of learning by accommodating their specific needs and complementing their learning styles. Most importantly, certain programs can help dyslexic learners find new ways to hone the skills they struggle with most. Because every student has unique educational requirements, learning plans such as individualized education plans (IEPs) and 504 plans can outline complementary teaching strategies and accommodations for students who qualify. Classroom Materials & Routines From multisensory activities to unique educational games, educators can implement various techniques to ensure that students with dyslexia expand their knowledge with lessons that match their learning style. Exposing dyslexic learners to new ways of interacting with the classroom can be as simple as implementing new routines into standard classroom activities. Classroom materials and new routines meant to help dyslexic students should reflect those learners’ preferred studying methods. For example, some teachers might implement visual schedules and advanced organizational tools to help students understand and keep track of their responsibilities more concretely. Teachers can provide students with a copy of written notes, or allow them to mark directly in workbooks or test booklets. Other changes in routines and classroom materials include giving students extra time to complete assignments, using reading buddies when appropriate, providing movement in the classroom and preferential seating. Providing the proper support to students with dyslexia can set up a child for life-long success. At The Dyslexia Resource, we are proud to serve and provide resources for dyslexic students and the educators and parents who work with the dyslexia community. The Dyslexia Resource offers online resources and teacher training coursesfor educators and parents so they can best empower dyslexic students to reach their full potential. Learn more about The Dyslexia Resource and contact us today.
What Are Common Accommodations for Dyslexia?
https://dyslexiaresource.org/category/dyslexia-friendl content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Jan 07, 2022
In Education, Home & Cyber School
(CNN) Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards on Wednesday granted a posthumous pardon to Homer Plessy, the man at the center of the landmark civil rights Supreme Court ruling, Plessy v. Ferguson. The governor was joined by Plessy descendants at a ceremony in New Orleans, where he officially signed the pardon. The ceremony, which was attended by city leaders and relatives, was near the original location where Plessy was arrested nearly 130 years ago. Plessy, a shoemaker, purchased a first-class ticket on June 7, 1892, to board a Louisiana train. He sat in the Whites-only section and refused to leave when a conductor ordered him to move to a rail car reserved for Blacks. He was arrested and convicted at a trial of violating the Separate Board of Pardonsvoted unanimously last November in favor of a pardon for Plessy, who died in his 60s in 1925. "This pardon has been a long time coming but it's a day that should have never happened," Edwards said. Plessy appealed his case to the Supreme Court. Four years later, the justices rejected his claim. Plessy v. Ferguson was a landmark case in which the court, on May 18, 1896, by a seven-to-one vote, found a Louisiana statue requiring separate but equal railroad cars for Black and White passengers did not conflict with the 13th and 14th Amendments. According to Brittanica.com, after the Supreme Court ruling, Plessy went back to Judge Howard Ferguson's court and pleaded guilty. He paid a $25 fine. "We still have a long way to go when it comes to equality and justice, but this pardon is certainly a step in the right direction," Edwards said. Plessy, who was one-eighth Black, was not caught off guard: He'd been among a group working with the Eastern Louisiana Railroad Company to protest the state law requiring rail companies to provide "separate but equal" places for white and nonwhite customers, and for patrons to follow suit. After the ruling, Plessy lived in New Orleans and worked as a clerk, collection agent for an insurance company, laborer or a warehouse worker. He stayed active in several social organizations. The so-called "separate but equal" doctrine was ultimately overturned by the Supreme Court in 1954's ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. "We are proud to be a part of the processing of this application under the authority of the Avery C. Alexander Act," Francis M. Abbott, executive director of the Louisiana Board of Pardons and Committee on Parole, previously said. The Avery C. Alexander Act is a Louisiana law which allows the governor to pardon people convicted of violating a state law or local ordinance created to enforce racial separation or discrimination.
Homer Plessy, of Plessy v. Ferguson's 'separate but equal' ruling, pardoned by Louisiana governor content media
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Dec 27, 2021
In Mom/Dad/Parents and More
By Nicquel Terry Ellis and Eva McKend, CNN When Danielle Atkinson's daughter brought home a second-grade assignment that highlighted Christopher Columbus's explorations, Atkinson said she began to notice inequities in the curriculum being taught in the school district. There were plenty of lessons about Columbus and other historic White figures, but the contributions of Black Americans were largely missing in the coursework at Royal Oak Public Schools in Michigan, she said. Atkinson and other Black and brown parents felt the students weren't learning enough about the civil rights movement, the Harlem Renaissance, the desegregation of schools and the importance of Black History Month so they formed the Royal Oak Multicultural Parents Association in 2016. They demanded more culturally diverse curriculum from the district, but Atkinson said she's seen little progress. "Our children are not having the education around race and history that they should, and it's to our detriment and it's a disservice to our children," said the mother of six, who is also founder of the Michigan-based Mothering Justice, a group that advocates for Black and brown moms. Now Atkinson feels like their calls for inclusion are being drowned out by a strong force of conservative, mostly White suburban mothers who have made national headlines for their efforts to ban critical race theory from schools. The largely White group of parents, many of whom have protested and spoken out at riotous school board meetings, helped ignite a national debate about whether anti-Black racism should be taught in America's public schools. The concept has become a social and political lightening rod with several states banning critical race theory this year and Republicans pledging to make it core to their midterm election strategy. Educators insist that critical race theory -- which acknowledges that racism is both systemic and institutional in American society -- is generally not included in grade school curriculum. The concept is usually taught in law school or graduate school.
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jseamon1
HBCU Alumni
HBCU Alumni
Dec 24, 2021
In Special Needs Info
Rebecca Mannis, a learning specialist and founder of Ivy Prep Learning Center in New York, says dyslexia can manifest at different times depending on the specific type of dyslexia, the student’s learning profile and their school and family life. “Children who have significant difficulty with early language development and who have trouble telling apart sounds, called a phonological deficit, represent the most common subtype of dyslexia,” Mannis wrote in an email. Dyslexia may be identified early in these children, she says, because they have difficulty learning sound-symbol relationships. “On the other hand, a bright, verbal child who has more difficulty with reading fluency or remembering sight words that can’t be decoded or sounded out, such as the words ‘thought’ or ‘would,’ may be able to compensate in early years,” Mannis says. Cases like that may go undetected until middle school or even high school or college. [READ: What Does ‘Neurodivergent’ Mean?] Education experts say there are many ways parents can help children with dyslexia, starting with recognizing common signs and taking action. Recognizing and Diagnosing Dyslexia People with dyslexia struggle to decode words, which is a crucial element of learning to read, Michelle Paster, an educational therapist and consultant in Massachusetts, wrote in an email. “Clinically speaking, the definition of dyslexia is a significant discrepancy between intelligence and performance in the area of reading,” she says. Dyslexia impacts a child’s ability to recognize and spell words, read at a good pace and understand what has been read, says Liz Matheis, a certified school psychologist and consultant in New Jersey. “Some children read words backwards, from right to left, and some write letters and numbers backwards,” says Matheis, although she notes that it is developmentally appropriate for children in first grade and below to reverse letters and numbers. “Children with dyslexia…struggle to consistently identify letters and sight words, and they confuse words that sound alike,” she says. “They also struggle to remember numbers and colors and with understanding rhyming sounds.” Often, there is a delay in speech development. It is commonly believed that people with dyslexia see words differently, with letters flipped around. “While this can sometimes be true, dyslexia is really a catch-all diagnosis for people who struggle for a variety of reasons to sound out words,” Paster says. “Dyslexia can be caused by difficulties with either visual or auditory processing or a combination of both.” Dyslexia Across Grade Levels Dyslexia can be diagnosed by a speech pathologist, an educational psychologist or an educational diagnostician, says Jeannette Washington, an author and speech pathologist in Michigan. The experts undertaking the evaluation will look at family history, oral and written language skills, reading, social skills and even motor skills. There are also specific cues by age and grade level. According to Understood, a nonprofit dedicated to providing parents with credible information about learning differences, common dyslexia signs at various stages include: [READ: Podcasts for Kids.] Preschool — Difficulty pronouncing words — Using general words to describe specific objects — Trouble learning rhymes — Difficulty with the alphabet and number sequences — Retelling events out of order — Difficulty with multi-step instructions Kindergarten through 2nd grade — Difficulty learning the names of letters — Trouble remembering what sounds letters make — Difficulty reading words without accompanying pictures — Substituting similar words when reading — Difficulty separating words into sounds and blending sounds into words — Trouble with spelling [READ: How Kids Can Get Dysgraphia Help in School.] Grades 3-5 — Missing or confusing small words, such as “of,” when reading out loud — Difficulty sounding out new words — Trouble describing the events of a story or answering questions about it — Difficulty recognizing sight words — Repeated mistakes of the same kind, such as letter reversals — Inconsistency with spelling — Frustration and avoidance of reading What Parents Can Do to Help Usually, dyslexia is treated with a specific program that helps children build phonological abilities and improve reading skills. Programs like the Orton-Gillingham approach, Project Read and Wilson Reading System are commonly used. “Although these treatments are helpful, they are very time intensive and do not work for all children,” says Amy Margolis, an assistant professor of medical psychology at Columbia University. Though experts say that almost every person who suffers from dyslexia can learn to read, Margolis says she sees a need for more research to develop new treatments for dyslexia. Parents can help their children by seeking a full evaluation from a licensed educational psychologist or neurologist, according to Matheis. If a diagnosis of dyslexia is reached, parents of public school students can then advocate for the right support and services. Mannis says parents can often be the most potent advocates. “By educating themselves and getting support, parents can then tee themselves up for the long haul and cheer their kids on as they reach smaller and larger milestones,” she says. Some families may also opt for special schools that focus on students with dyslexia. “Sometimes, kids need to move to a school that specializes in teaching children with dyslexia to read,” Margolis says. “These schools can turn a child’s life around, allowing them to experience success in school and develop good academic skills.” Dyslexia Resources for Parents For parents who want to know more about dyslexia, there are many resources available: — Decoding Dyslexia is a parent-led advocacy group with branches in many states that can provide information. — Understood is a nonprofit dedicated to providing parents with credible information about learning differences, including dyslexia. — The International Dyslexia Association is a nonprofit dedicated to education and advocacy. — The Reading League provides resources and support for teachers and parents. Searching for a school? Explore our K-12 directory. More from U.S. News How English as a Second Language Affects Learning What Is Dyscalculia? What Is ‘Decoding’? What Is Dyslexia? originally appeared on usnews.com
What Is Dyslexia? content media
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